Russians leak 20,000 tonnes oil inside Arctic Circle

Russians leak 20,000 tonnes oil inside Arctic Circle: A state of emergency was announced in Russia after a 20,000-tonne oil spill has polluted an area of 135 square miles of the Arctic Circle.

A subsidiary of Norilsk Nickel‘s diesel power plant collapsed last Friday, leaking the fuel into the Ambarnaya river – the collapse was said to have been caused by melting permafrost leading to ground subsistence causing supporting pillars to sink into the earth they rested on.

Despite the leak happening last week, Vyacheslav Starostin, the power plant’s director tried to limit the spread of the diesel in secret and did not alert Russian authorities for two days.

The director has now reportedly been taken into custody but not charged. The Russian Investigative Committee has launched a criminal case to investigate alleged negligence.

The national government is diverting extra workers to go to the area to participate in the environmental clean-up operation after the state of emergency had been announced.

Russians leak 20,000 tonnes oil inside Arctic Circle

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